Window Contractors Chicago IL

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Window Contractors. You will find informative articles about Window Contractors, including "Windows". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Chicago, IL that can help answer your questions about Window Contractors.

Next Door & Window
9704 Industrial Dr.
Bridgeview, IL
Services
Specialty Contractor
Membership Organizations
Angie's List, Better Business Bureau

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Chicago Home Window Replacement
(866) 531-5632
70 W Madison St # 3500
Chicago, IL
 
Marvin Windows and Doors
(773) 927-8282
633 W Pershing Rd
Chicago, IL
 
Newtec Window & Door MFG
(773) 869-9888
3159 W 36th St
Chicago, IL
 
Payless Drapery & Linens
(773) 247-4942
4738 S Ashland Ave
Chicago, IL

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Rusco Windows and Doors
6182 S Cass Ave
Westmont, IL
Services
Specialty Contractor, Remodeler
Membership Organizations
Better Business Bureau, EnergyStar, Pella

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Budget Blinds of Bucktown
(866) 839-4770
2214 W Belden Ave
Chicago, IL

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Shine Glass Renewal
(815) 621-9223
3214 W Haddon
Chicago, IL
Services
Glass Repair and Restoration

Armaclad Windows & Doors
(773) 446-7800
4422 W 46th St.
Chicago, IL
 
Aaa Crosstown Garage Door
(773) 284-1100
5212 S Archer Ave
Chicago, IL

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Windows

Selecting or replacing your house windows

There's a reason many homes for sale list "new windows" as a feature: it can be a daunting task to replace your windows. However, changing your windows can also dramatically change the appearance of your home and usually increases its value.

When you are shopping for windows, your first consideration should be shape and fit.

Hanging-style windows slide up and down in the window frame, while sliding windows move back and forth. These are ideal for homes without air conditioning because they open wide and can let in a significant breeze. Many new window styles tilt in rather than slide. These will fit in most traditional window spaces and are much easier to clean, but they don't allow as much of a breeze and may limit the use you can make of your windowsill.

Basement windows are often called awnings or hoppers because they open horizontally with the latch either at the top or at the bottom of the window. These are perfect for spots where you can fit only a small window.

If you are renovating your bathroom and are in search of a new window, consider vinyl windows or fiberglass windows instead of the traditional wood window. These are easy to install and won't rot or warp like wood can, making them ideal for moist spaces like the bathroom . They are also more energy efficient.

Fiberglass windows are more lightweight than aluminum windows or wood windows, but they may not stand up to harsh weather as well. Consult an expert on what works best in your area.

Common Kinds of Windows:

Storm Windows

Storm windows offer extra protection to common windows in areas that experience heavy rain, wind or snow. Storm windows can be installed either on the outside of the main window or against the inside. A storm window can also improve a window's energy efficiency in cold climates, therefore keeping your house warmer (and your heating bills lower). Some storm windows can be simple sheets of plastic, merely adding extra insulation to your regular window, while others are full sheets of glass mounted to the outside of your house – just like having a double set of windows. You should install storm windows before the weather gets too cold, wet or rainy because you don't want to trap moisture between the two sets of windows.

Bay Windows

Bay windows provide an expansive view and lots of light, not to mention the perfect place for a window seat! A bay window is a classic spot: In movies, characters often sit on the bench of their bay windows looking dreamily out through the rain or sunshine, depending on the tone of the movie. In real life, bay windows are ideal book nooks. Bay windows protrude from the wall of your home and have three sides, often with one wider panel in the middle and two slightly narrower panels on each side. These are the panels that touch the house. Bay windows do not generally open, so the window is ideal for great views, but is not usually great for ventilation.

Replacement Windo...

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